latest updates:

community driven, owned, and sustained

JEI trains paralegals from communities affected by oil extraction in the Niger Delta >> more

JEI trains paralegals from communities affected by oil extraction in the Niger Delta >> more

Ogoni communities fight government land grab by taking their case to the Natl. Human Rights Commission >> more

Ogoni communities fight government land grab by taking their case to the Natl. Human Rights Commission >> more

Lagos slum dwellers train Port Harcourt waterfront communities on savings >> more

Lagos slum dwellers train Port Harcourt waterfront communities on savings >> more


what we do

JEI trains, monitors, and supports networks of individuals providing community-based paralegal services in rural and urban poor communities in Nigeria.

Through the paralegal network and more broadly, JEI supports movement-building and inter-community solidarity within and between poor and marginalized communities.

When necessary, JEI undertakes strategic advocacy or litigation to backstop the work of paralegals and the activities of the broader community-based movement. 

Recognizing the power of locally generated information, JEI supports community-level documentation and data collection as a foundation for all of its activities. Moreover, because complex problems require multi-dimensional responses, JEI undertakes strategic collaboration with other organizations to leverage strengths and ensure lasting impact.

take action

JEI is people-powered. Without partners, supporters, advocates, friends, and allies, our work would not be possible. Join us. 

Poor and marginalized communities can become members of the Community Legal Support Initiative (CLSI) to receive free paralegal training and advocacy support. 

Others can participate by donating to support JEI and the communities we serve.

Other organizations with complementary aims can partner with CLSI and JEI to broaden and deepen our impact. Please contact us.


advocacy spotlight: forced eviction of badia east community, lagos state

Without notice, consultation, or resettlement, at 7am on February 23 2013, bulldozers and armed men from the Lagos State Government descended on the Badia East community, demolishing the homes and businesses of over 9,000 residents. 

Not only was the land subject to ongoing litigation before the Lagos State High Court, but the Badia East community was an intended beneficiary of the $200 million dollar World Bank funded Lagos Metropolitan Development and Governance Project (LMDGP) urban upgrading activities. >> more